Dante’s Inferno and Holy Week

Did you ever realize that the classic, Dante’s Inferno, happens from good Friday morning until Saturday?

If you’re like most that last time you thought about this dead poetry, was in High School. This work though has a transcendent meaning, about the stat of souls after death, but it’s also about the here and now. The present moment. And it’s in our here and now that we need perspective and positive motivation to help us through our trials.

Here’s a great free course on Dante’s Divine Comedy, one of Western civilization’s most acclaimed early works, from Hillsdale College. Go check out this 3 minute intro video, and take a course at no cost. You might just discover an amazing college and resource, and you might find out a bit on the meaning of life.

https://lp.hillsdale.edu/divine-comedy-course-pre-registration/

In the Inferno, Dante gives us an eternal perspective on life that’s reliable and trustworthy. We often lose our way in our daily grind. We forget what’s important, and why we do all we do.

Dante’s Divine Comedy provides an education for people who are facing great obstacles and adversity. The poem teaches you how to confront life’s challenges, order your soul, and pursue an excellent and free life. These timeless lessons are especially urgent for Americans today.

Inferno is the first part of Italian writer Dante Alighieri’s 14th-century epic poem Divine Comedy. It is followed by Purgatorio and Paradiso. The Inferno describes Dante’s journey through Hell, guided by the ancient Roman poet Virgil.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inferno_(Dante)

What never ceases to amaze me is the similarities we face as humans. The story begins in 1300—literally 720+ years ago and yet we can relate to the humanity of our characters on the journey that takes place. I think people are the same, despite technology, history, all we’ve learned and forgotten.

Anyway, don’t take my word for it. Go read some classics and educate yourself on the human condition. In an age obsessed with social justice, it’s refreshing to see some divine inspiration, even in the midst of walking through Hell.

Need some perspective, have a go at this course and share your experiences with us.

Dali’s Divine Comedy

And here’s a great video (and Cliff Notes) on Salvador Dali’s collection on the Divine Comedy, from Dallas Museum of Art.


For more information, visit Hillsdale College at https://online.hillsdale.edu/

Visit https://dma.org/programs/event/virtual-exhibition-talk-dalis-divine-comedy

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